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 16.01.2016        5         7604      

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 04.10.1996        5         375      

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Tech

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 10.03.1977        5         1985      

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The Make-or-Break Policies that Will Determine the Future of European Tech

The truth is: Neither successful policymaking nor true entrepreneurship can exist without the other. As European innovators, we’re talking about this now because our continent’s tech sector — and all the potentially world-changing seeds of ideas contained therein — is at a crossroads. Europe lags behind giants like the US and China in both the sheer number of innovative companies and in market growth. Fragmented by nature, Europe is an especially challenging case in building an ideal environment for international businesses to thrive. If recent history (read: the last few years) teaches us anything, it’s that the cause of Europe’s slower growth isn’t from lack of entrepreneurial ambition or investors. On the contrary, it’s from the many barriers that slow the pace of development for these new companies — from existing, country-specific tax laws to proposed liability regulations that could crush startups before they have a chance to start at all. Facing the truth about fair regulation A recent white paper published by jointly by Allied for Startups and Silicon Allee, The Impact of Regulation on the Tech Sector, saw over 180 European investors giving their anonymous input on the topic. Members of Berlin’s tech ecosystem also weighed in at an event after the white paper was published, echoing the sentiments of the paper. Results make clear that European tech could experience major growth — if only it was afforded the right conditions. Most of the proposed regulations in Europe that affect startups tend to be unnecessarily reactive instead of strategic. Policymakers draft legislation with the intention of limiting large companies, but they often forget that these strict laws also apply to growing startups with fewer resources and less global influence. It’s a pattern that shouldn’t have began in the first place, but now it needs to be broken.
 18.12.2018        0         0      

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The Internet of Things (IoT)

A major outgrowth of the Digital Age has been the mass production of data. It’s become such a recognized sensation that people started saying that “data is the new oil”. There are really two categories of data: public data and private data. The Internet is the largest oil well of public data and is unique because it’s an ever-increasing resource. Private data is mostly concentrated on private servers, especially in Clouds, and contains sensitive information that people either don’t want to freely share or don’t want seen. It shouldn’t really be surprising anymore that many of the largest companies in the world own the most data, like Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Baidu. Most of the data gathered today is done through the use of applications, such as Google gathering data based off search results, or Facebook gathering data based off your social profile, or even Amazon gathering data based off people’s spending habits. Essentially, companies host applications that consumers willing use and then collect data metrics based off their activity. There are also open-source applications that anyone can derive metrics from like markets, sports, or open case records. However, to harness intelligence capable of making quick judgments like humans, there must be access to real-time data. Until recently, real-time data has been hard to come by, but now, thanks to some major innovations in sensor and actuator technology, it’s become a real reality. All types of sensor activity is possible, such as sensors that measure temperature, location, speed, acceleration, depth, pressure, blood chemistry, air quality, color, photo-scanning, voice scanning, biometrics, electric, and magnetic force. Normally, humans are required to take such measurements, but that is quickly changing due to the mass production of cheap, yet accurate sensors and actuators. They’re not only placed in the environment, but within machines, like industrial machinery and robotics, and within/on humans, like a Fit or high-tech pacemakers. If there is going to be an autonomous economy, there needs to be a river of real-time information constantly flowing. The only way that autonomous action is effective is if it can respond quickly with confident judgments. Having the ability to monitor intricate details in real-time about a facility, its equipment, the environment it operates in, and even its workers (humans or robots), is transformational on many levels and has yet to be seen in mass. Essentially, everything, both physical to non-physical, is being brought online as data into an interconnected web, hence the name, the Internet of Things. It’s the human senses in digital form. However, raw data is only as good as the filtering mechanism that analyzes it. Without proper analysis, applications would be like animals acting off instinct, which is why artificial intelligence is an important component of automation.
 18.12.2018        2         0      

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By The Crypto Oracle

When examining the past, it becomes clear that advancements in technology have undoubtedly been the leading driver in the progression of human civilization. Just like the wheel and compass revolutionized previous generations, developments of the smartphone and the Internet have completely changed society today, making it hard to even imagine a world without them. While it’s easy to look back in history and identify the key breakthroughs, most people are unable to foresee the technological innovations of the future before they become fully embedded into everyday life. In fact, most new technologies are ridiculed in their beginning stages, with “experts” claiming they’re unachievable and unnecessary. However, despite the doubt that stubbornly clouds the present, many believe that current technological trends are on the precipice of igniting a fourth industrial revolution; this time sparked by the rise of mass automation. While economies directed by humans are likely to never disappear, what is starting to happen is the formation of a parallel economy run entirely by machines. Similar to industrial revolutions of the past, the current one is coalescing around certain technological breakthroughs, specifically in the Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence (AI), and Distributed Ledger Technology(DLT). While the average person has little to no awareness of what’s coming, the trajectory of modern technology isn’t going unnoticed by everyone. Brian Arthur, an economist famous for developing the modern approach to increasing returns, has proposed a thesis to describe the phenomenon and coined it, “the autonomy economy.” Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, has echoed comparable sentiments and even wrote a book about it called “The Fourth Industrial Revolution.” Before taking a closer look at current technological trends, it’s beneficial to study the impacts that the first three industrial revolutions had on society. Possessing historical knowledge can go a long way in helping one envision how the Fourth Industrial Revolution will impact the future.
 18.12.2018        0         0      

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